Heide’s Blog, 4th January 2019

 

 

Hello and Happy New Year!

The first week of 2019 is almost over.

I said last week that during 2019 I’m going to be more specific about the subjects of my posts.  And I stand true to my word!

During January, we’ll be discussing “Property Purchases”.  So we’ll be talking about anything to do with buying a property.

 

We’ll be talking about the following:

Buyer types – Are you a first time buyer?  A next time buyer? An investment buyer?  Are you buying a holiday home?  A second home?  Are you buying a shared ownership property?

Stamp Duty – The amount of stamp duty you will pay on the purchase of your property will be dependent on the above factors.  Where can you check what you’ll pay?

Property types – Is it a house? Flat?  Leasehold?  Freehold?  Where is it located?  Is it of standard structure or is it a timber frame?  Thatched roof?  Ex-council?  Is it near commercial outlets?  Is it listed?  Does it have solar panels?

Deposit – Where is your deposit coming from?  Why does it matter?  How do you prove where your deposit has originated?

Conveyancers – What is a conveyancer?  What do they do?  Why do I need one?

Surveyors – What is a surveyor?  What do they do?

Of course we’ll also be talking about your mortgage.  Do you want a repayment mortgage?  Do you prefer interest only?  Do you have investments or other repayment vehicle to pay back an interest only loan at the end of the mortgage term?  Do you what a standard mortgage or an offset mortgage?

What should you expect from your estate agent?  What other third parties may be involved in the purchase?

If you have any questions that I can cover in a general way (for specific, tailored advice, please contact me directly) or if you have any suggestions or comments, please don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Thanks and I’ll see you again next week!

Phone: 01525 309300
Mobile: 07903 302895

Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Twitter: @SwiftMortgages1
Linked In: Heide Swift
Instagram: Swift Mortgages
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SwiftMortgages/

Your home may be repossessed if you fail to keep up the repayments on your mortgage.

Buy to let mortgages are not regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

#SwiftMortgages

#BePrepared

#HappyNewYear

Heide’s Blog, 28th December 2018

Hello again.  I hope you’ve had a lovely Christmas.

Whether you’re already back to work or if you’re off till the new year, I hope you’ve still go some lovely things to look forward to in the next few days.

Last week I reflected on the past year and how quickly it’s flown by!

This week I wanted to share with you my plans for next year.

In terms of managing my social media – Linked In, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram – I haven’t (to date!) had much of a plan or theme.  During 2019 I wanted to make it a bit more structured and hopefully, easier to follow!

I will take 12 general “themes” and have one theme each month (so far, so good!).  I will share content I think may be of use or interest.  For example, if I’ve come across an issue in a particular area which may be helpful to others, I’ll share it.  If you have any particular questions about any of these subjects them please feel free to get in touch.  Be aware that anything shared on social media is generic and shouldn’t be considered “advice”.

If you have any questions relating to your specific circumstances then please feel free to get in touch privately.

 

So, here’s what’s on the cards for 2019:

January – Buying a home. 

Buying a new property with a mortgage.  Being prepared, what you can do in advance and how to make the process as smooth as possible.

February – Re-mortgaging. 

Although the process is similar, preparing to re-finance your existing home is different to buying a new property.  Hints and tips.  And timings.

March – The Application Process. 

What should you expect during the mortgage application process?

April – Buy to Let. 

Financing an investment property with a mortgage is different to arranging a mortgage for a property you intend to live in.

May – Help available from other professionals. 

There is a whole ream of help out there from 3rd parties.  Knowing who to turn to may help you at some time now or in the future.  For example, estate agents, letting agents, accountants, tax specialists, book-keepers, financial advisors, surveyors and conveyancers.

June – Different types of Mortgage. 

Maybe “a mortgage is just a mortgage”, but do you know the different types of mortgages available to you and do you know their pros and cons? What may be beneficial to your friends or family may not be as good for you and your personal circumstances.

July – Your Credit Report. 

Things affecting your ability to get a mortgage relating to your credit score and credit rating may not be just as simple as adverse credit.

August – Equity Release. 

Recently there has been a huge increase in the requirement for “later life lending”.  People own their own property which is worth significantly more than they paid for it due to house price increases.  Often, though, people have only their state pensions to live on.  They are considered “asset rich and income poor”.  During August, we’ll talk about Equity Release.

September – Financial Protection. 

You own your own home.  But are you – and your home – financially protected in the event the worst happens?  If you lose your income, or your health is affected?  During September we’ll discuss financial protection.

October – Be Prepared. 

Being prepared means looking at options available to you in advance.  Making sure everything’s ready before the last minute.

November – Other types of Property Finance. 

A mortgage is one type of finance secured against the value of a property.  However, there are options available in the event a new mortgage or re-mortgage doesn’t suit your requirements or current financial situation.  For example, a secured loan or bridging loan may be something you’d like to consider.

December – Frequently Asked Questions. 

There are questions that come up often in my conversations with people.  They cover various topics and during December, I’ll share them with you.

 

I look forward to seeing you again in 2019 and thank you again for your engagement and support during 2018.

If you need to consider your options for a new mortgage or a re-mortgage next year then please don’t hesitate to get in touch at any time for a complementary initial review.

In the meantime, here’s wishing you a Happy New Year!

 


Your home may be repossessed if you fail to keep up the repayments on your mortgage.

Buy to let mortgages are not regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority.

Equity Release will reduce the value of your estate and can affect your eligibility for means-tested benefits.

#SwiftMortgages

#BePrepared

 

 

 

 

 

Heide’s Blog, 21st December 2018

Hello again!

This week’s blog is really just one of reflection and gratitude.  An opportunity for me to say “thank you” to everyone I’ve worked with over the past 12 months: new clients, repeat clients, networking contacts, business colleagues and everyone else who has supported and helped me grow my business over the past year.

So, here’s a review of my year in pictures.

 

Today is the 21st December which is the shortest day of the year.  From tomorrow, days get longer and lighter.  It won’t be long till spring is with us again!

If you need to consider your options for a new mortgage or a re-mortgage next year then please don’t hesitate to get in touch at any time for a complementary initial review.

In the meantime, here’s wishing you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Your home may be repossessed if you fail to keep up the repayments on your mortgage.

 

#SwiftMortgages

#BePrepared

Phone: 01525 309300
Mobile: 07903 302895
Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Twitter: @SwiftMortgages1
Linked In: Heide Swift
Instagram: Swift Mortgages
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SwiftMortgages/

Heide’s Blog – 14th December 2018

It’s nearly Christmas and it’s the time of year for planning and preparing.  Getting things ready for the big day so things go perfectly.  Or as perfectly as possible.  You can’t plan for the unexpected but if you plan, you’ll at least know you’ll be in control for the majority of the time!

It got me thinking about Santa and how he manages to plan his journey to perfection – everything timed so nobody gets missed and the job’s done by the deadline.  Plenty of time, then, before he needs to worry about the next deadline.

Children send him their wish-list in plenty of time so he can ensure everyone’s happy and all his paperwork is done with plenty of time to spare!  They don’t want to be disappointed on the big day so they make sure they get their letters in before the Royal Mail delivery deadline.  They couldn’t possibly risk not having their toys on Christmas day, because they hadn’t sent their letter to Santa in on time.

It made me think about mortgages in a similar way.

If Christmas day is your moving day (or, if you’re re-mortgaging, it’s the day your current mortgage deal expires) then you want to ensure you’ve done everything possible to have your mortgage in place by that deadline.

In order to have the mortgage in place, you need to do the groundwork.  In the same way as the children need to have their letters to Santa sent on time, you need to have all your paperwork made available to your mortgage advisor (Santa!) to avoid any unnecessary delays and disappointments.

So, when your mortgage advisor tells you what documents you need to provide, think of it as your letter to Santa.

Get it in as soon as possible.  You won’t be penalised for having all your documentation ready early.  In fact, the sooner you have it ready, the better prepared you’ll be and the less stressful the whole process may be.

Getting everything together early will ensure if there ARE any questions or queries, there will still be plenty of time to deal with them before the big day arrives.

Make your list.

Check it twice.

Be prepared.

Send your letter early to avoid disappointment!

If you need any help in establishing what your “mortgage requirements list” looks like then please don’t hesitate to get in touch!  Don’t leave it to the last minute……

By clicking on any link contained in this blog you are departing from the regulatory site of Swift Mortgages. Neither Swift Mortgages nor Intrinsic is responsible for the accuracy of the information contained within the linked sites.

Your home may be repossessed if you fail to keep up the repayments on your mortgage.

Phone: 01525 309300
Mobile: 07903 302895
Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Twitter: @SwiftMortgages1
Linked In: Heide Swift
Instagram: Swift Mortgages
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SwiftMortgages/

Heide’s Blog, 16th November 2018

Back in January 2018, The Sun newspaper reported the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) saying nearly one in 5 mortgage customers in England and Wales – nearly 1.67 million households – have an interest only-mortgage.   These mortgages were described as a “ticking time bomb” as households could be in danger of losing their homes with no method repaying their mortgage at the end of the mortgage term.

See the newspaper report here: January 30th Article

Interest only mortgages were popular in the mid-1990s – around 25 years ago – when endowment policies were sold along-side the mortgage.  For the duration of the mortgage, borrowers would pay only the interest due on their mortgage and they would further pay into an endowment policy whose funds were invested.  Hypothetically speaking, at the end of the mortgage term (25 years later) the funds within the endowment policy would be worth enough to be able to repay the mortgage loan in full and the property would then be paid for in full.

The reality is, the endowment policies did not perform as expected and many of those mortgages are due to mature very soon but as there are insufficient funds within the endowment policies, there will be a shortfall between the amount to be provided by the endowment policy (if, indeed, the policy is still in place) and the amount owed to the mortgage lender.

Lenders had an obligation to write and advise their borrowers they needed to make provision for the repayment of the loan at the end of the mortgage term.

However, there was nothing the lenders could do to FORCE these borrowers to arrange an alternative repayment method.  This means there are thousands of households facing an uncertain future and possibly up to one in 10 households had no suitable repayment vehicle.

They could downsize to repay the loan but the value of property now means this method is certainly not guaranteed to provide them with enough equity with which to buy a property.

It’s possible there are people who may be unaware they are only paying interest on their mortgage loan.  One area of vulnerability may be women, perhaps who are widowed or living alone.  They may not be fully aware of the details of their mortgage if their husbands generally took control of the financial decisions.  They may be in their late 50s or early 60s and still working.  They will probably have lived in their home for a number of years – 20 years or more.  They may have children who have left home.


If you know of anyone in this position, try and get them to look into it as soon as possible. There may be things that can be done but the sooner they can be implemented the better.

For a complementary initial review please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

By clicking on any link contained in this blog you are departing from the regulatory site of Swift Mortgages. Neither Swift Mortgages nor Intrinsic is responsible for the accuracy of the information contained within the linked sites.

Phone: 01525 309300
Mobile: 07903 302895
Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Twitter: @SwiftMortgages1
Linked In: Heide Swift
Instagram: Swift Mortgages
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SwiftMortgages/

 

Heide’s Blog, 9th November 2018

Budget: 29th October 2018

On 29th October, Philip Hammond, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, presented his budget to the House of Commons.

“…austerity is coming to an end – but discipline will remain” were his words, summarising his presentation.

Some of the key points he raised in the budget are here:

personal tax allowance

Personal tax allowances will be raised from April 2019.

  • Basic rate tax threshold will be increased to £12,500
  • Higher rate tax threshold will be increased to £50,000

capital gains tax

From April 2020, if you move OUT of your residential property and rent it out, private residence relief will be reduced from 18 months to 9 months.  This means if you sell the property after moving out you will be liable to capital gains tax on the sale of the property within 9 months.  This may occur if you move back in with parents or perhaps you move in with a partner and you rent your own home out.   If the reason for moving out of the home is disability or moving into a care home then the capital gains exemption period remains at 36 months.

From 6th April 2020 (the year after next) capital gains tax will be payable within 30 days of the sale.  Currently the system allows up to 21 months (depending on when the sale occurs) before the tax becomes due.

inheritance tax

The inheritance nil rate band will remain at £325,000 for 2019-2020.

The residence nil rate tax band will increase to £150,000 from 6th April 2019.

  • Both of these allowances can be used before the 40% inheritance tax is implemented.


savings

The amount you are able to invest into an ISA remains at £20,000 for 2019-2020.

Children’s ISA limit from 6th April 2019 is £4,368.

pensions

The lifetime pension allowance will increase to £1,055,000 for 2019-2020.  So if you are planning to draw down your pension and your funds already exceed the current £1.03million limit it may be worth waiting until April to do so.

If you are employed and are in an auto-enrolment pension scheme, the minimum contributions will increase significantly (employer and employee contributions) so be aware of that.

stamp duty land tax (SDLT)

Stamp Duty Land Tax relief to first time buyers in England and Northern Ireland will be extended to the purchase of shared ownership property and this relief will be effective 28th October, 2018 and back-dated to 22nd November 2017.

Check your stamp duty liability here: SDLT Calculator

There are plans for a consultation in January 2019 regarding the implementation of a SDLT surcharge of 1% to non-residents buying residential property in England and Northern Ireland.

budget summary

To read parliament’s summary please click here: Parliament’s Budget Article

 

Your home may be at risk if you fail to keep up the repayments on your mortgage.

By clicking on any  link contained in this blog you are departing from the regulatory site of Swift Mortgages. Neither Swift Mortgages nor Intrinsic is responsible for the accuracy of the information contained within the linked sites.

Phone: 01525 309300
Mobile: 07903 302895
Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Twitter: @SwiftMortgages1
Linked In: Heide Swift
Instagram: Swift Mortgages
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SwiftMortgages/

 

Heide’s Blog, 2nd November 2018

This week’s blog is all about credit! 

 

I’ve had a couple of cases this week which involved credit issues of various kinds.

Although your credit rating may be good, it’s worth checking what your existing credit balances are. In other words, check what your available credit is.

If you have credit cards, you will be told what the available credit is on your monthly statement. If you are almost at the capacity of available credit on your cards, even though you may have made payments on time, this may affect your ability to take out additional credit.

Late payments are not good! Make sure you pay at least the minimum payment required each month. On time! Your statement will specify the date by which you need to make the payment and also what the minimum payment is.

If you feel you are being charged unfairly for something you may feel justified not to make the payment.

However, be aware that the provider may present you with a default which will appear on your credit report. Even if you pay the bill after the default has been received, your credit report will show that it had been ‘satisfied’.

Lenders will have their own views on satisfied defaults. They normally expect satisfied defaults to have been satisfied for a specific period of time.

The length of time since the default was received can be a factor (even if it has been satisfied).

Whether or not the default has been satisfied will be a factor. Even if it was received years ago, if it hasn’t been satisfied it will still show on your credit report that you owe the money.

The amount of the default can also affect the decision. The higher the amount the worse the effect.

A default on a mobile phone bill or utility account will still appear on your credit report.

If your mobile phone bill includes the payment for the handset, it may appear on your credit report as a loan.

A late payment will appear as a late payment. The reason for the late payment is not specified on your credit report.

Late payments on a mortgage are late payments on a loan secured against a property. Failure to make the repayments on a mortgage could result in the property being repossessed.

Late payments because you forgot to make the payment is not ‘preferable’ to missing the payment because you didn’t have the money to pay it.  In fact, it might indicate a failure to manage your finances.

 

My top tips:

  • Be aware of the credit you have available and the level of that available credit being used.
  • Get a copy of your credit report before you apply for a mortgage.
  • Know what loans, credit cards and hire purchase agreements you have.
  • Know what the monthly repayments are.
  • Set up the minimum payment to your credit card(s) each month.
  • Make sure you have enough money to pay your mortgage payments each month.
  • Ensure you’re registered at your current address on the electoral role.
  • Don’t change your bank account and stop any standing orders/direct debits until you know they have been transferred to your new account.
  • If you have adverse credit wrongly applied, query it and appeal it. Keep any written evidence of the reversal such as letters or emails. It may take a few weeks for any change to your credit report to be applied.
  • To check your credit, you could use Equifax, Clearscore or Experian.

 

Hot off the Press!

An article from Martin’s Money Saving Tips explains Experian will help tenants’ rental payments to be recorded on their credit file, in association with Rental Exchange.  Read the article HERE*.

 

Any questions? Give me a shout!

Your home may be at risk if you fail to keep up the repayments on your mortgage.

*By clicking on the links you are departing from the regulatory site of Swift Mortgages. Neither Swift Mortgages nor Intrinsic is responsible for the accuracy of the information contained within the linked site.

Tel: 07903 302895

Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com

Website:www.swift-mortgages.com

#SwiftMortgages

#BePrepared

#Credit

 

 

Heide’s Blog, 26th October 2018

This week I came across my first case of Japanese Knotweed which had been picked up in a survey on a property.   The buyer had withdrawn their offer on the property and the vendor instigated their own independent report.

Japanese Knotweed is the most invasive plant known in the UK and it can cause major problems to property.

 

It can grow up to 7 metres in height and it can push through walls, block drains and lift patios if not treated.

Japanese Knotweed Damage

The known presence of Japanese Knotweed in the vicinity of your property (even it it’s further than 7 metres from the building or even on a neighbouring property) can affect the valuation.  Some lenders may refuse to lend if there is any sign of the plant, whereas others will take a view on it.  Usually dependent on the results of a specialist report.

Generally the Japanese Knotweed will need to be successfully treated or removed (with proof of responsible off-site disposal and a 10 year guarantee for the works).

The cost of either local herbicidal treatment or off-site removal will vary, as will the time taken for the results to be effective.

Some lenders will expect you to retain savings for future treatment in case of possible recurrences.

An article in “Mortgage Solutions” in September 2018 indicates between 4% and 5% of houses in the UK are directly or indirectly affected by Japanese Knotweed (see the article HERE).

Furthermore, the article says 850,000 – 900,000 properties have experienced a reduction in value of 10% due to its presence.

By law, vendors must disclose to potential buyers that the property has experienced problems with Japanese Knotweed and this information itself can act as a deterrent to buyers.

Japanese Knotweed originates from volcanoes in Japan and it’s hardy enough to grow up to 10cm in a day.  It takes light and nutrients from other plants which often kills them in its wake.

Knowingly allowing Japanese Knotweed to grow to a neighbouring property can result in a fine of £2,500.

April to October is the main season for the growth of Japanese Knotweed but mild winters have extended the growth period from March to November.

HERE is the link to an independent website which contains videos to show you how to identify signs of the plant.

 

By clicking on any of the links contained in this blog you are departing from the regulatory site of Swift Mortgages. Neither Swift Mortgages nor Intrinsic is responsible for the accuracy of the information contained within the linked sites.

Phone: 01525 309300
Mobile: 07903 302895
Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Twitter: @SwiftMortgages1
Linked In: Heide Swift
Instagram: Swift Mortgages
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SwiftMortgages/

 

Your home may be at risk if you fail to keep up the repayments on your mortgage.

Click here for my blog archive: https://www.swift-mortgages.com/blog/

Use the hashtag: #SwiftMortgages to keep in touch

#SwiftMortgages

Heide’s Blog, 19th October 2018

Once you have secured your mortgage, it’s vital you ensure your investment is protected.

A condition of the mortgage itself will be that the building is insured.  We would recommend you take the insurance out from the point of exchange of contracts as that is when your transaction becomes legally binding.  Most owner/occupiers will extend the buildings insurance to make sure their contents are also protected against damage, loss and theft.  Landlords will need to ensure they get the best possible protection for their investment property so may wish to take out a buildings insurance policy aimed specifically at buy to let properties and may include accidental and malicious damage to the property by tenants.

Most people avoid thinking about the possibility of illness, injury or loss of job.  However, it does happen and any of these circumstances may affect your mortgage payments which in turn, could result in the loss of your most valuable asset – your home.  Your mortgage is likely to be your biggest financial commitment and therefore it may be affected most by any sudden reduction in income. Looking at protecting your investment is a fairly straight-forward process:

A mortgage protection policy (a life insurance policy to pay out the balance of your mortgage in the event of a mortgage applicant dying, during the mortgage term) will ensure your loved ones need not worry about the cost of maintaining the mortgage payments.  The mortgage will be paid off by the proceeds of the life insurance policy.

An income protection policy will provide you with a monthly income which can be tailored to suit your specific income requirements and to any existing provision made by an employer.  So, if your employer will pay you in full for the first 6 months of sickness, we will only look at benefits starting after 6 months.

A critical illness policy will provide you with a lump sum of money, to help you out in times of need, in the event you are diagnosed with a qualifying critical illness.  This does not need to be a terminal illness, but a sum of money may enable you to take some unpaid time off work to recover, or get a 2nd medical opinion or have your illness treated privately.

Family Income Benefit will provide your family with an annual income for a specific period of time (tailored to suit your requirements) on the death of one of the mortgage applicants.  Assuming a mortgage protection policy has paid the mortgage balance, the additional income may be used to cover general household expenditure, childcare costs etc.

We look at your property purchase in a holistic way and will offer you the opportunity to protect it against unforeseen circumstances in the most cost-effective way to suit your personal and financial requirements.

Swift Mortgages offers business protection too so if you have any queries regarding key man insurance, relevant life insurance, shareholder protection or group cover then why not contact us for more information?

To give an idea of the risks of death, illness or being unable to work, why not put your details into this Risk Reality Calculator (courtesy of Liverpool Victoria).  Please note that the results are for illustrative purposes only and based on average statistics.

Liverpool Victoria’s Risk Reality Calculator

By clicking this link you will be departing from the site of Swift Mortgages, neither Swift Mortgages nor Intrinsic are responsible for the accuracy of the information contained within the linked site.

For a complementary initial review of your existing financial protection, or if you’d like to find out how I can help, why not give me a call or email me?

Mobile: 07903 302895

Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Website: https://www.swift-mortgages.com/
#SwiftMortgages
 #ProtectionIsImportant

There are other providers of Payment Protection Insurance (Short-Term Income Protection) and other products designed to protect you against loss of income.

For impartial information about insurance, please visit the website at www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk

 

Heide’s Blog, 12th October 2018

What exactly is the house purchase process?

 

The mortgage is just a small part of the whole journey and of course not everyone buys with a mortgage.  Effectively your mortgage is the funds you need to buy the property and whether you buy with cash or a mortgage it’s only a part of the process.

Initially you will need to decide where to buy.  If you’re moving out of your parents’ house and staying locally then the likelihood is, this won’t be an issue.  You’ll know the area and have a good idea where you want to be.  But if you’re moving out of your local area due to relocation with work, for example, this may be more difficult.

Do your research.

Visit the area.  Look around at different times of day.  Go to local shops, pubs, restaurant and speak to people.  Buy the local paper and watch the local news. Check out the local schools and amenities.  Try out local transport links.

What’s on your “must-have” list?  Can you be flexible with them?

When you know where you want to live  – check out local prices in the area you want to be.  When you know how much your ideal property will cost, make sure you check that you can actually afford it!

If you’re buying cash you’ll know exactly how much you have and that’s easy.

If you’re buying with a mortgage, make sure you check in advance of viewing and making offers, that you can raise the mortgage you need.

If you’re dependent on a mortgage AND the sale of another property to buy your new pad, make sure you work on the basis of “worst case scenario” for the sale of your existing property.  If you have to accept a lower offer for your current home and you’ve budgeted for selling at a higher price then that will leave you short.  Where is the deficit coming from?

Take a look at my earlier blog which talks about preparing in advance for your mortgage: Prepare for your Mortgage

How much can you afford?

Once you’ve found the sort of price range you need to buy in, make sure you check your mortgage affordability before you start viewing.  If you need to adjust your price range, it’s better to know BEFORE you’ve found the house of your dreams!

When you know what you can afford and where you want to live, you can start looking.  Check out on-line sites and also local estate agents.  Don’t forget, not all the estate agents are registered on all the general sites so it’s worth checking individually as well.

Is it near schools?  Is it in the catchment area you want?

What are transport links like?

Are you close to an airport?  Trainline?  What’s the noise like?  Check at different times of day.

Visit again and watch what goes on – is the traffic bad during the week?  If you’ve only viewed on a weekend you may not get a holistic picture.

Enjoy your buying journey! 

Making sure you have a check-list prior to viewing property will ensure you don’t waste a lot of time looking at unsuitable property.

For any assistance please don’t hesitate to get in touch!


Your home may be repossessed if you do not keep up repayments on your mortgage.

The Financial Conduct Authority does not regulate Buy to Let mortgages.

Phone: 01525 309300
Mobile: 07903 302895
Email: heide@swift-mortgages.com
Twitter: @SwiftMortgages1
Linked In: Heide Swift
Instagram: Swift Mortgages
Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/SwiftMortgages/

Use the hashtag: #SwiftMortgages to keep in touch

Click here for my blog archive: https://www.swift-mortgages.com/blog/

#SwiftMortgages